It’s a great new corporate world, if you can keep up with it

 It’s a great new corporate world, if you can keep up with it

Emerging and maturing technologies are impacting the corporate work environment in exciting, sometimes staggering ways. Greater workplace mobility, the ‘quantified workplace’ (applying data analytics to the world of work) and the human cloud are just a few examples. “We’re seeing a more diverse array of complex offerings for any enterprise to consider, which requires some pretty skillful navigation,” says Peter Miscovich, Managing Director of Corporate Solutions with Jones Lang LaSalle.
Technology is also a factor in corporate real estate. Miscovich gives the example of Kansas City, where Google has laid down broadband networks that will go to 30 cities. “Those buildings and neighbourhoods that have high broadband capabilities will be valuable,” he says. “It will be a digital divide between the haves and the have-nots.”
The 54-year-old admits that for himself, keeping up with technologies is a full-time job: “I keep up with business strategy trends, tech trends, workforce trends, workplace trends, HR trends. Each of these areas becomes complex with globalization, with hyper-competitivenes, and with accelerated change.” 
 
Continual transformation is the new norm. Whereas 20 years ago most real estate portfolios and assets were a safe bet in the long term, investors today must think short term.  “If you’re making a 10-year real estate commitment,” Miscovich says, “you don’t know if you want to be in that location for 10 years, what will be the head count of the workforce in that location, or what new changes in your business or in technology might alter that 10-year commitment.”
 
This really is a new world, requiring a new breed of worker. What defines great talent today? Candidates who are good listeners, good problem solvers, good learners, good collaborators and innovators, who are also very adept and comfortable with technology. “Design thinking in that left brain right brain capacity is, I think, much needed today,” he adds.
 
Candidates find themselves in a workplace that their grandparents might find unrecognizable. The work environment has become flatter, more collaborative, less structured. It requires more autonomy and self-management. The work and processes are more complex because they offer so many options in terms of how and where to accomplish a task.
 
Adding to that complexity is an increasingly diverse workforce, not only ethnically but generationally. “By 2020, for the first time in human history we’re going to have five generations in the workplace,” Miscovich says. “That will be a new landscape for us all but I find it very exciting.”

on July 17, 2014